Markdown is a way of writing text that gets automatically transformed into websites. Simply put, Markdown is the best way to write content for the Internet. There is very small learning curve, and once you get it, it’ll enable you to get your thoughts down without worrying about styling. Have you ever been in writing in Word and had the indentation for bulleted lists go wonky on you? Have you nearly pulled your hair out? I have, and that doesn’t happen with Markdown.

Headers

Headers should be on their own line and start with the # symbol.

You write:

# Header 1
## Header 2
### Header 3
#### Header 4
##### Header 5

And this comes out:

Header 1

Header 2

Header 3

Header 4

Header 5

Paragraphs

Paragraphs work just like you probably expect. They are simply just text surrounded by whitespace. There’s plenty of whitespace in markdown, embrace it.

You write:

Here is a Markdown link to [Google](http://google.com).

And this comes out:

Here is a Markdown link to Google.

Bold, italics, and inline code

Instead of pushing a button on the toolbar, like in Word, you simply put a few extra characters around a word or words.

You write:

Now some inline markup like _italics_,  **bold**, and `code()`.

And this comes out:

Now some inline markup like italics, bold, and code().

Images

Pictures are inserted similarly to links. You just add a ! before them. The images need to be available via a URL. Just like any image you ever see online.

On the actual blog post page, there will be a lightbox effect autmatically applied to all your images.

You write:

![picture alt](http://placekitten.com/500 "Hover text")

And this comes out:

picture alt

Blockquotes

Block quotes are useful when… quoting someone. They are lines of text that start with the > character.

You write:

> Blockquotes are like quoted text in email replies

And this comes out:

Blockquotes are like quoted text in email replies

Lists

Bulleted lists

You write:

- Bullet lists are easy too
- Another one
- Another one

And this comes out:

Numbered lists

You write:

1. A numbered list
2. Which is numbered
3. With periods and a space
1. The order of the numbers doesn't matter

And this comes out:

  1. A numbered list
  2. Which is numbered
  3. With periods and a space
  4. The order of the numbers doesn’t matter

Code formatting

When you are writing a post and want to differentiate that some text is code, you can either do that inline or as a block.

Inline

You write:

You can get the square root of a number with the `sqrt()` function

And this comes out:

You can get the square root of a number with the sqrt() function

Block

You write:

```
function sqrt(number) {
  return Math.pow(number, 0.5);
}
```

And this comes out:

function sqrt(number) {
  return Math.pow(number, 0.5);
}

Horizontal rules

You write:

--------------------------

And this comes out:


Tables

Tables are more advanced. The spacing doesn’t matter so much as the characters. I think an example explains this best.

You write:

 | Header | Header | Right Aligned |
 | ------ | ------ | ------------: |
 | Cell   | Cell   | $10           |
 | Cell   | Cell   | $20           |

And this comes out:

Header Header Right Aligned
Cell Cell $10
Cell Cell $20